Next Generation Air & Heat, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘Furnace Repair’

Having These Problems? It’s Time for Furnace Repair Services

Monday, February 4th, 2019

inside-of-a-furnaceLet’s face it, we don’t have particularly harsh winter conditions here in Palm Bay. This doesn’t mean that your heating services are any less important than those of our neighbors up north. This time of year is normally the time when homeowners start to notice their heating problems. Don’t ignore these problems or think that you can just wait it out until spring. When you’re having trouble with your HVAC system it’s always a good idea to act quickly.

Sometimes homeowners don’t always know the signs that their furnace quality is headed south so we’ve listed the top reasons below. If you need furnace repair services in Palm Bay, FL then contact our team. We’re available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, and we’ve serviced Central Florida since 2007–we’ll always provide the best services for your home.

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How Scheduling Furnace Maintenance Prevents Repairs

Monday, October 6th, 2014

As you may or may not know, most furnace manufacturers recommend that you get your furnace checked for problems at least once a year. In fact, most warranties require annual maintenance be conducted on the furnace in order for it to remain covered. This is all well and good, but what is the true purpose of scheduled maintenance visits? After all, why not wait until the furnace begins to act strange before calling a professional? Below are some of the ways that regular maintenance actually prevents the need for repairs and saves you money.

Preventing Progressive Decline

Major problems with your furnace rarely spring up out of nowhere. The vast majority of issues that cause your furnace to break down begin as small issues. Maybe you have a bit of carbon buildup on your burner, or a partially blocked gas line. Maybe your exhaust flue isn’t venting as well as it could be. No big deal, right? Actually, any one of these issues could lead to a major problem if left alone long enough. That last one, in particular, could prove dangerous to your health by trapping poisonous combustion gases in your home. These are known as progressive problems, because if left alone they will keep getting worse.

Some issues, like a leaky or partially blocked gas line, may not cause your furnace to stop working right away. They will, however, cause a loss in efficiency for which your furnace will have to work harder to compensate. This can cause an increase in your heating bills, as your furnace runs longer to try and reach the thermostat temperature without enough fuel to do so effectively.

If you schedule regular maintenance, you can catch all of these problems before they get bad enough to force costly repairs or replacements. You’ll also increase the overall efficiency of your system by having it maintained, which saves you money on heating bills. In the end, the benefits of regular furnace maintenance far outweigh the cost.

If you haven’t scheduled your annual heating maintenance yet, call Next Generation Air & Heat Inc. We conduct furnace repair and maintenance throughout the Merritt Island area.

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Vero Beach Furnace Repair Question: What Causes Cracks in a Heat Exchanger?

Friday, February 3rd, 2012

Furnaces are designed so that the heat – and the combustion byproduct produced inside – doesn’t interact directly with the outside air. This design is to ensure you have a safer furnace in your Vero Beach home that won’t inadvertently affect your family’s health.

The metal piece that separates the furnace heat from the outside air stream is called the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger performs a very important function, and if it is broken or cracked, it can’t work properly.

A cracked heat exchanger is very common problem with heating systems, as well as one that should be repaired as soon as possible. But what causes a heat exchanger to crack? Here are some of the most common reasons:

  • A long period of normal use. A furnace heat exchanger naturally expands and contracts with the heat of the furnace, over and over again as the furnace is turned off and on to heat the home. Over several years, this stress can crack the metal.
  • Poor air flow, often caused by dirty or obstructed vents, can result in poor air flow through the furnace. This overworks the furnace, which can crack the heat exchanger prematurely.
  • Poor, incomplete or improper combustion can also cause a heat exchanger to crack. When the combustion process is less efficient – which can also be a result of poor air flow — your furnace’s burners have to run hotter and longer to heat your home, which means extra stress on the heat exchanger.

Essentially, if a furnace is running at less than optimal efficiency for an extended period of time, the heat exchanger is put under additional stress beyond the usual and can crack prematurely. Therefore, the best way to prevent a cracked heat exchanger is proper maintenance, particularly keeping all vents clean and unobstructed and getting an annual maintenance inspection.

If your heat exchanger does crack, do not hesitate to call a professional and get it repaired. The crack can allow potentially dangerous combustion gases to seep into your home, which can have a negative impact on your family’s health.

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Winter Garden Heating Tip: Troubleshooting Furnace Air Flow Problems

Friday, January 20th, 2012

Whenever you notice furnace air flow problems in your Winter Garden home, you can usually do a little troubleshooting and solve the issue on your own. Most air flow problems can be fixed easily and quickly. Here are a few guidelines to get you started, but if you need help or notice other problems with your furnace, call a qualified Next Generation Air and Heat heating technician.

Furnace Filters:
Checking the furnace filter is the first step you should take when there are any issues with your furnace, but especially with air flow problems. If a filter is dirty enough, the furnace will not come on at all. Ultimately, a clogged or dirty filter restricts the air flow, and this is the source of air flow problems ninety percent of the time.

Supply Registars and Cold Air Returns:
Once you’ve replaced or cleaned the filter, check your cold air returns, which are the vents that draw in the cold air in forced air systems. When a cold air return is blocked  by furniture or other obstructions, they cannot draw in enough air to allow the furnace to put out an adequate amount of hot air. Make sure they are open if nothing is blocking them.

Next, check your supply registers, which are the vents that supply the warm air, and make sure they are open as well. Whenever your heat is on, all of your supply registers should be open. Closing some vents will not increase the air flow in other vents in the house. Closing off one or two in areas where heat is not always needed will not hurt your system; however, when you close too many supply registers, it can cause problems with the ductwork and eventually damage the furnace if the air pressure is not correct.

Clean Your Vents:
You should have a qualified HVAC technician professionally clean your ducts and vents at least once a year, which is another reason it’s important to schedule annual maintenance visits. A professional cleaning is typically part of the yearly heating system inspection. You can help by vacuuming your vents regularly, particularly during the months the heating system is not in use, or at least before you turn it on in the fall. Simply cleaning your vents can help air flow and extend the life of your entire heating system.

If you continue to experience air flow problems, call a certified Winter Garden heating technician at Next Generation Air and Heat. There could be a more serious issue, or if you have a newer furnace, your original ductwork could be the wrong size for that furnace model.

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HVAC Contractor Tip: Furnace Air Temperature

Wednesday, December 21st, 2011

When your furnace turns on every day and warms your Orlando home, just how hot is the air being blown through your vents? It’s a common question and while it varies depending on the type of furnace you have and the length of your ductwork, normally, the air is about the same temperature in most homes.

The Heating Process

When you turn on your furnace, it ignites fuel (gas or oil) or heats elements (electricity). A blower fan blows air through the heat exchanger and then into ductwork that distributes the heated air to vents around your home. When the combustion occurs and air is first heated, the temperature is between 140 degrees F and 170 degrees F.

This is extremely warm and could be dangerous to anyone if they got too close to it or it was blown directly into your home. However, as the heated air is distributed into your home it starts to cool. In some cases, it loses a significant amount of its energy in the ductwork.

This is intended, of course, because the temperature would be much too high if it was distributed directly to your rooms. That’s why high velocity ductwork often requires regulation to avoid overheating of the air. Cooling like this is normal and results in a better, more evenly distributed airflow.

When Something’s Wrong

To know something is wrong with your heating system, you must first understand what temperature air normally is when distributed through the vents. This will vary depending on which room you are in and how big your home (and furnace) are. However, if you notice a sharp drop off in comfort level in your home, it takes longer to heat rooms when cold or if that heating is suddenly uneven, it may be time for someone to inspect your furnace and check for potential problems.

A technician will then check to see if the air is being heated to the target 140-170 degrees F or if heat is being lost in the air handler or ductwork. There are a number of issues that can contribute to lost heat in your heating system – the easiest way to be sure the problem is solved properly is to call an Orlando heating and air conditioning contractor when you notice the problem.

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Windermere Heating Tip: What to Check If Your Furnace Isn’t Lighting

Monday, December 19th, 2011

If your furnace isn’t lighting properly and your family is starting to suffer because of it, there are a number of possible problems you should check for before calling a Windermere heating contractor. Some of these issues can be fixed quickly by you while others may be signs of a serious problem that needs professional attention right away.

Checking the Pilot Light

If you have a gas furnace, the first step is to check the pilot light and ensure it is still working properly. If the pilot light is still on but goes out when you try to light the furnace or simply won’t stay on when you relight it, you may need to have the gas valve replaced. In some cases, it is as simple as the pilot light not being large enough and the gas blowing out the light.

This happens when gas enters the chamber and doesn’t ignite right away. When it does ignite, which happens after more gas enters the chamber, the extra force of the ignition will blow out the light. This is still a problem and should be inspected to ensure you don’t have any potential gas related issues.

Still Not Lighting

If you don’t have a pilot light or the unit still isn’t lighting, it may be an electrical issue. Electrical ignitions for gas furnaces should spark when the thermostat is turned on, so if it doesn’t you know that the switch or relay are bad.

If you smell gas or anything similar in the room where the furnace is located, you should immediately turn off the unit and call your gas company, followed by a technician. There could be a leak causing low pressure that results in your pilot light going out. Whatever the case, you need someone to look at it immediately.

Your furnace should always turn on when you flip the switch and if it does not, assume there is a problem. If you cannot find the problem yourself and easily fix it, you should call a professional. The risk inherent in an improperly working furnace (especially gas or oil) is too high to ignore.

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Heating Contractor Guide: How to Fix a Faulty Furnace Blower

Wednesday, December 14th, 2011

The blower fan on your furnace is designed to distribute warm air through the ductwork in your Port St John home evenly, ensuring you use all of the energy consumed by your furnace. If the blower doesn’t turn on when the furnace turns on or it continues to run when the furnace is off, it can cost you money and result in cold rooms. Here are some tips on how to fix a faulty furnace blower.

What is the Problem?

First, check to see what the problem is. If your furnace blower remains on all of the time, it may be a thermostat issue. Make sure the fan isn’t set to stay on continuously (a common setting for most air handlers). You should also check the limit control switch to make sure it is working properly. If this is broken, it needs to be replaced which is a relatively simple fix.

If the furnace blower isn’t turning on at all, you may have a belt problem. This can be fixed by you if you have the proper tools. To repair the belt problem, first turn off all electricity to the device. You’ll need to remove the old furnace blower belt, so release the tension in the pulleys before removing the belt.

Installing a new belt is not unlike doing so for your car. Make sure to check the blower or your user manual for proper tension when you install the new belt. Make sure you purchase the right size belt and set it to the right tension. If you cannot or you do not feel comfortable doing so, you should call a professional to inspect and repair the problem for you.

Getting the Blower Back Up and Running

Once your new belt is in place, test the system carefully, starting with the lowest setting (if there are variable settings). If it does not yet work or if something sounds strange, call a technician right away. You don’t want the motor to burn out or something else more substantial to go wrong with your furnace or air handler during the middle of the winter.

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