Next Generation Air & Heat, Inc. Blog: Posts Tagged ‘thermostat’

Having Trouble with Your Heater? Try Upgrading Your Thermostat

Monday, March 4th, 2019

programmable-thermostatNow that winter is starting to melt into spring here in Florida, it’s the perfect time to reflect on the quality of the heating system in your home. You might have noticed that it felt as though you were battling with your heater all winter long. You should never feel like this! If you’re having trouble with the quality of heating in your home, you might shy away from service because you’re assuming it’s a problem with your actual heating unit. In actuality, it might just be a problem with your thermostat.

Don’t underestimate the impact of your thermostat on your home comfort. Your thermostat is like the “brain” of your HVAC system. So when something is going awry, then it impacts every single other part of your HVAC system. A thermostat upgrade in Palm Bay, FL can greatly increase your home comfort. If you’re ready to make the switch make sure that you contact our team today.

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Air Conditioning Tip: Why Your Thermostat Matters

Monday, April 7th, 2014

Anyone with a heating or air conditioning system is doubtless familiar with the thermostat. The device reads the temperature in your home and allows you to establish a specific setting by which the HVAC system will turn on and off. Older thermostats used mercury switches. Newer models use electronic components to facilitate all kinds of bells and whistles (such as smart technology that detects your energy use patterns and remote access that lets you turn the HVAC system on and off from a distance). Here in Palm Bay, FL, our air conditioning services can correct most any problems your thermostat can encounter. It’s as important as any other component in your system and often more so.

Here’s a quick air conditioning tip: why your thermostat matters.

In the briefest possible terms, it matters because it’s the control point for your heater and air conditioner. It’s what allows you to set a temperature that keeps your family comfortable, and what lets you accurately gauge the conditions in your home to make that decision. When the thermostat can’t do that, you’re going to encounter serious problems. If the thermostat’s controls are faulty, for example, it won’t turn the system on and off when you need it to. Your HVAC unit will either run longer than it should or will refuse to run for as long as you need it to. The same thing will happen if it can’t read the temperature correctly, either because some internal component is fault or because it’s placed in a spot in the home (such as near a draft) that doesn’t reflect the overall temperature.

Regardless of the causes, any problems of this nature will soon make it very clear why your thermostat matters. When problems arise, here’s another air conditioning tip: Next Generation Air & Heat, Inc. is ready to help. We work in Palm Bay, air conditioning problems of all sorts are our specialty, and we can replace or replace a faulty thermostat, as well as moving it if it needs to be in a different spot in your home. Give us a call if you encounter any difficulties. You’ll be glad you did!

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HVAC Contractor Tip: How to Replace a Thermostat

Friday, January 13th, 2012

There are a lot of common household tasks that Cape Canaveral do-it-yourselfers can handle beyond changing light bulbs or replacing a fuse. One of those is changing out a thermostat. The reasons for replacing a thermostat can vary from making an upgrade to changing out a thermostat that is not working right – or at all. Whatever the reason, the task is pretty simple and require s very little time and very few tools.

Let’s set the stage.

The materials you will need are the replacement thermostat, wire connectors, electrical tape (optional), needle nose pliers, and a screwdriver.

Here are the steps:

  1. Turn off electrical power to the existing thermostat. You can do this by flipping a breaker switch or removing a fuse from your home’s electrical panel. This would be a good time to make a note of the circuit’s location, writing the circuit number on the panel door or using a sticker.
  2. Remove the cover from the existing unit. You should be able to locate the screws that hold it to the wall mounting plate. Remove the screws and pull the unit away from the wall and mounting plate. Be careful not to touch the electrical wires together on the thermostat.
  3. Disconnect the wiring. Carefully remove the electrical wiring from the unit and keep the wires apart. You might want to tape the bare ends and also ensure that the wires don’t fall back through the wall. If the wires are not color coded, mark each one and which terminal they were removed from. Remove the mounting plate.
  4. If you are using a new mounting plate, make sure it fits over the existing hole and then pull the wires through the opening of the plate. Make sure the mounting plate is secured to the wall with the proper screws.
  5. Now match the wires to the terminals on the new thermostat. The wires are usually color-coded but if not, make sure you attach the right wires to the corresponding numbered terminals on the next thermostat. A green wire, which operates the furnace fan blower, is connected to the “G” terminal. The white wire operates the heater and attaches to the “W” terminal. The yellow wire operates the air conditioner and connects to the “Y” terminal. Use a wire nut to secure the wires and keep them apart from other wires. Ignore any other wires coming out of the wall as they are not necessary and may have been added by the original builder for other purposes.
  6. Carefully move the wires back into the wall as you line up the new thermostat on the mounting bracket. Install the new bracket and secure the thermostat to the bracket.
  7. Turn your power back on and check your thermostat by setting the temperature high or low, to engage the furnace or air conditioner.

This simple procedure can be done in less than 10 minutes. But if you have any doubts and want greater peace of mind, call a Cape Canaveral heating and cooling contractor to perform the installation.

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How a Thermostat Works

Monday, July 4th, 2011

Your thermostat is designed to closely monitor and maintain the temperature in your home. When you flip the switch, you want your furnace or air conditioner to respond immediately. So, it’s a good idea to learn how it works so that if there is a problem, not only will you know better what needs to be fixed – you can decide whether to call a professional in for help.

Thermostats shouldn’t need input from you other than to set the initial temperature. From there, they are automatic switches. A thermometer inside the thermostat measures the indoor air temperature. When it gets above or below the limit you’ve specified, it triggers the thermostat to send a message to your home comfort system and keep things nice and comfortable.

Types of Thermostats

Thermostats come in two forms –electromechanical and electronic. An electromechanical thermostat is the simplest and has been used for decades to regulate temperature in homes. It has a simple strip or coil of metal that expands as the temperature rises and contract as it lowers. A mercury thermometer is placed on top of the strip. The coil’s movements cause the vial to tip as the temperature changes. There is a pair of electrical contacts on either end of the vial. The mercury can absorb that electrical current when the electrical contacts touch the thermometer. The mercury then acts as a switch to turn on your comfort system.

An electronic thermostat simply has an electronic sensor that measures the indoor air temperature. You set a temperature for your room and when it changes significantly, the switch inside your electronic thermostat is triggered, causing it to turn on your comfort system.

Ways to Upgrade Your Thermostat

Most homes only need the bare minimum in their thermostats. However, there is some very exciting technology on the market these days that can add quite a bit of value to your system. Not only can you install a programmable thermostat, you can opt for zone control systems that allow multiple thermostats in different rooms of your home.

Programming allows you to set temperatures for certain times of the day. This is especially great if you are gone from the house for long periods of time each day. Why heat or cool a home when it is empty? And if you have multiple people with different temperature needs, zone control temperature control allows you to set specific temperatures for specific rooms in your home – a very enticing option for large families or multi-story homes.

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